Saga Prefectural Museum

A window into Saga's archeology, culture, and folklore

そらみみ / CC By SA 4.0
By Kim B   - 2 min read

The Saga Prefectural Museum was opened back in 1970 as part of a commemorative project celebrating the 100th anniversary of the Meiji era, and aims to educate visitors about this part of Japan. The venue showcases Saga's art, culture, archaeology, and history — and whilst not all of the exhibits have English language translation panels, it's still an interesting stop for those who are traveling to the region.

The nature section is split into areas about the prefecture's geology and biology. You'll find fossils that have been discovered in the area, alongside displays of plants, mammals, wild birds, insects, and even marine life from the nearby Ariake Sea. The section dedicated to archeology, history, arts, and crafts has pieces which date all the way back to the Paleolithic era until the Meiji era. Items like Jomon pottery pieces, swords, and mirrors which have been excavated in Saga are just some of what you'll find in this part of the museum.

The museum also has an on-site cafe, which serves up a range of light meals, drinks, and sweets using locally-sourced ingredients. Lunch is served between 11.30 am and 2.30 pm, but the general cafe area opens from 9.30 am until 5 pm. Coffee and ice creams are also available for takeout.

Getting there

By Public Transport:

The Saga Prefectural Museum is located a 15 minute bus ride from the JR Saga Station, served by the Nagasaki Main Line.

By Private Vehicle:

Alternatively, if you opt to drive to the museum, take the Saga Yamato Interchange from the Nagasaki Expressway. The museum is around a 25 minute drive from the expressway exit. There are two free parking lots on the museum grounds which accommodate just over 100 vehicles. When special exhibitions are on the parking lots fill up quickly, so public transportation is advised.

Kim B

Kim B @kim.b

I'm an Australian who has lived abroad for almost a decade, including 7 years in Japan - specifically Tokyo and Niigata. I've  visited 44 of 47 prefectures, with only Kagoshima, Miyazaki and Kumamoto left to check out. I'm particularly fond of exploring off the beaten path destinations, gardens, ...