Kyoto Tower

Reviews

Kyoto Tower is an observation tower located in Kyoto, Japan. The steel tower is the tallest structure in Kyoto with its observation deck at 100 metres and its spire at 131 metres. The 800-ton tower stands atop a 9-story building, which houses a 3-star hotel and several stores. [Wikipedia]

Overview

Address

721-1 Higashishiokojicho, Shimogyo Ward, Kyoto (Directions)

Hours

9:00 - 21:00 Closed now

Opening Hours

Monday 9:00 - 21:00
Tuesday 9:00 - 21:00
Wednesday 9:00 - 21:00
Thursday 9:00 - 21:00
Friday 9:00 - 21:00
Saturday 9:00 - 21:00
Sunday 9:00 - 21:00
Holidays 9:00 - 21:00

Phone Number

075-361-3215

Website

https://www.kyoto-tower.jp/en/

Payment Method

  • Credit cards accepted
  • Pay by cash
  • Credit card - JCB
  • Credit card - Visa
  • Credit card - Mastercard
  • Credit card - Diners

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