Masobyo

51 Review
Photo: Various images / Shutterstock.com

Masobyo Temple (媽祖廟), also called Ma Zhu Miao, is located in Yokohama’s Chinatown. The young Taoist temple, which opened relatively recently in 2006, enshrines Mazu, the Chinese Goddess of the Sea. Despite its young age, the temple exudes ancient spirituality older than its years. The structure has a geometrical base and is decorated with blue, green, red, and gold detailing. A massive gate welcomes visitors and worshippers alike and is connected to the main temple with a line of red lanterns. Inside Masobyo, a statue of Mazu is cloaked in vibrant attire and wearing an imperial headdress, symbolizing her godly status. The interior is equally as impressive as the outside with exquisite designs covering every surface. Worshippers commonly go to the temple to pray for safe travels since, historically, sailors and fishermen would pray to the goddess for calm seas during their journeys.

Overview

Address

136 Yamashitacho, Naka Ward, Yokohama, Kanagawa 231-0023, Japan (Directions)

Hours

9:00 - 19:00 Open Now

Opening Hours

Monday 9:00 - 19:00
Tuesday 9:00 - 19:00
Wednesday 9:00 - 19:00
Thursday 9:00 - 19:00
Friday 9:00 - 19:00
Saturday 9:00 - 19:00
Sunday 9:00 - 19:00
Holidays 9:00 - 19:00

Price

Free entry

Phone Number

+81 45-681-0909

Website

http://www.yokohama-masobyo.jp/eng/index.html

Access

Ten minute walk from Ishikawa-cho Station (JR Negishi Line), or 3 minute walk from Motomachi Chukagai Station.

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Masobyo Temple in Yokohama's Chinatown

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Masobyo Temple in Yokohama's Chinatown honors Mazu, a Chinese Taoist goddess. Visitors are welcome to pay respects and receive fortunes from this protector of travelers and sailors. Elaborate decoration and statuary make it a photogenic spot.

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Masobyo

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