Yokohama Stadium

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Photo: 掬茶 / CC BY-SA 4.0

Yokohama Stadium is located in Naka-ku, Yokohama, and is a multi-purpose stadium. These are quite rare these days. Yokohama Stadium opened in 1978 and can seat over 30,000 people. Today the stadium is primarily used as a baseball stadium Home field of the Yokohama DeNA BayStars, but American football games and live events also take place there.

Overview

Address

Yokohamakoen, Naka Ward, Yokohama, Kanagawa 231-0022 (Directions)

Hours

10:00 - 18:00 Closed now

Opening Hours

Monday 10:00 - 18:00
Tuesday 10:00 - 18:00
Wednesday 10:00 - 18:00
Thursday 10:00 - 18:00
Friday 10:00 - 18:00
Saturday 10:00 - 18:00
Sunday 10:00 - 18:00
Holidays 10:00 - 18:00

Phone Number

045-664-7011

General Amenities

  • Nursing rooms
  • Information Counter
  • Lost and Found
  • Restroom
  • Kids menu

Accessibility

  • Wheelchair rental
  • Disabled parking
  • Barrier-free access
  • Guide dog access
  • Braille signage
  • Multi-purpose toilet

Access

A 2-minute walk from the south exit of Kannai Station on the JR Negishi Line; a 5-minute walk from the north exit of Ishikawacho Station on the JR Negishi Line; a 3-minute walk from Exit 1 of Yokohama Municipal Subway Kannai Station; a 3-minute walk from Exit 2 of Nihon Odori Station on the Minatomirai Line.

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